Way Back Wednesday

BlueJaysVsYankeesSept2012Way Back Wednesday is a feature FanCred does, I’ve mentioned them here before, click the tag to see the post. The theme for today is “Your favorite sports moment at your favorite sports venue”. This picture only partially fits, O.K., not at all since these are from the old Yankee Stadium and I go to the new Stadium. I never liked the old Stadium and yes I know Yankee fans see that as heresy. Deal with it.

These are tickets from last year, the game was rained out and I couldn’t go to the make-up game. I traded them in for this Saturday’s game, Sylvia will be there and it looks to be a fun time. I was smart this time and scanned them before I traded them in.

Elston Howard was the first African American player on the Yankees. He made his debut on April 14, 1955 and played most of his career for the Yankees. In his last year he was traded to the Red Sox but then came back to the Yankees as a coach. His number (32) was retired in 1984. He won the MVP award in 1963, the Babe Ruth award in 1958, has two gold gloves, World Series Champion 4 times and played in 12 All-star games. No I never saw him play, how old do you think I am? I did watch a Yankeeography about him.

November 1, 2001 Scott Brosius hit a home run to tie game 5 of the World Series. It was a great moment, unfortunately the Yankees lost that World Series to the Diamondbacks, making them one of the teams that was able to take advantage of a human moment by Mariano Rivera. I didn’t see Scott Brosius play either, that was during my non-baseball years. I don’t know if there is a Yankeeography about him.

That’s it for my way-back Wednesday.

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What does Theodore Roosevelt have to do with the New York Yankees?

Nothing actually. I just finished reading “Island Of Vice: Theodore Roosevelt’s Doomed Quest To Clean Up Sin Loving New York” by Richard Zacks. Part of the reason vice was so prevalent in Manhattan was because the Police Department was corrupt. A NYPD officer would look the other way, for a price. Roosevelt tried to oust a police captain (I actually don’t remember his rank) Big Bill Devery, despite many charges and trials he was never convicted. 14 months after Roosevelt left Big Bill was sworn in as police chief and vice ran rampant in the city. He was eventually fired and with his ‘earnings’, he purchased property and even bought a share in a racetrack. With his bookmaker pal Frank Farrell he bought a struggling baseball team in Baltimore for $18,000 and brought it north in 1903. The ball club was soon called the “Highlanders” or “Hilltoppers” but would later change its name to “New York Yankees”. I was not expecting that.

They didn’t win many games. Riddle: “What animal comes from the bushes, doesn’t know what to do with a bat, cannot even catch a fly, and lives on goose eggs?” Answer: “The New York Yankees”.

In 1915 they sold the team for $460,000.

Selfish Curtis Granderson

The Yankees swept the Mets. On June 8th the Yankees won 9-1, they hit 3 home runs in this game. It was the first game Johan had pitched after his no-hitter and the three home runs came one after the other against him. The next game was on June 9 and I wrote about it in my last blog post, they hit 2 home runs winning the game by 2 runs. In the game on June 10, the Mets were up 3 runs until the 7th inning then Russell hit a 2 run home run, then two more runs in the 8th put them ahead. Sori gave up a run in the top of the 9th to tie the score. In the bottom of the 9th Russell hit another home run, this was for the win, a walk off home run. Yankees hit home runs in each game.

The series against the Braves was a sweep also, and the Yankees hit home runs in each of those games. June 11, 3-0 and 1 home run; June 12, 6-4 with 2 home runs; June 13, 3-2 with 1 home run.

In some of these games, you could say they wouldn’t have won without the home runs. The game on June 10th, the winning run was a home run. On June 9th the Yankees won by 2 runs and scored 3 of their runs by way of home runs. The home run hit by Mark Teixeira was with Curtis Granderson on base, the one Curtis hit was a solo shot. Phil also pitched very well, only giving up 2 runs to the Mets, so that helped. In the game against the Braves on June 12, going into the 8th the score was 4-0 Atlanta, then with the bases loaded Alex Rodriguez hit a home run. It was his 23rd Grand Slam, tying him with Lou Gehrig (this made Lindsey sad, I was sad too, but then someone pointed out even though he tied the record, that doesn’t make Alex as great a player as Lou. I don’t know if that made Lindsey feel better, but it helped me). After Robbie got on base, Swisher hit a home run to put the Yankees up 6-4 and then on June 13, Curtis hit a two run homer in the 6th which put the Yankees ahead.

However there were other games that would have been run without the home run. Such as the game on June 11 against the Braves. First of all, Ivan pitched a shut out, and he got a hit, his first. The Yankees scored three runs, one was a home run, so without that home run the Yankees would have won 2-0 instead of 3-0.

Then there was today’s game, which the Yankees were winning going into the 9th inning with a score of 6-1, all without a home run. We were all excited, thinking “Will this be it? Will the Yankees finally win a game without hitting a home run?” Yes the Yankees have hit at least one home run in all of their winning games. Then Curtis Granderson just had to hit one out of the park. His 20th this year and the Yankees are still without a winning game without a home run. Will it never end? Curtis is just so selfish.

I managed to type that without laughing. The Yankees are getting men on base, not all their home runs are single shots, and what better way to bring your teammates home than with a home run? The Yankees have power hitters in their line ups and Curtis wasn’t going to swing for a single with a 3-1 count. Not when he got a 4-seam fastball. Joe keeps telling people, a home run is a hit. Someday they’ll believe it.

While I don’t know yet if the Yankees are going to sweep, they are off to a good start. And for the last two sweeps, fireworks are in order I think.

Swisher honored at Munson Awards Dinner

My sweet Nicky got an award! In thanks for all his charitable works, like his Swish’s wishes etc. He was honored at the Thurman Munson Awards Dinner. The first one was held in 1980, the year after Munson died and his widow hoped that the memory of her husband would influence positive change in the community for a short while. 31 years later, the Awards are still going, people still remember Thurman Munson as a great man, Nick Swisher said that to hear his name in the same sentence with Munson “was amazing”.

Of Nick Swisher, Diana Munson is quoted as saying: “I love the way he plays, I love his enthusiasm. Most importantly, he respects the history of baseball and the Yankees. On Old Timers’ Day, he was out there getting autographs and taking pictures. He’s not embarrassed by his love of the game, and respects the players. Plus, he’s cute.”

Charitable athletes honored with ‘Thurmans’

1976 ALCS

Turned on to see if the game was on, Yankees vs. Houston Astros, (4-6 btw) and once again I find myself watching Yankees Classics. This time it is game 5 of the 1976 ALCS, NY Yankees vs. Kansas City Royals. In 1976 Billy Martin was manager and it was the first year Catfish Hunter pitched for the Yankees and it was also the first time they had been back to the World Series since 1964. They didn’t win it in 1976. The announcers were Howard Cosell, Keith Jackson and Reggie Jackson. Chris Chambliss hit the winning home run, it makes the Top 10 Playoff Home Runs in Baseball History list. It seems weird to see #25 on the mound, and #2 being worn by a skinny black guy. First baseman Chris Chambliss was a rather good looking man. In fact, if you check out the YouTube clip below, he was still rather good looking in 2008.
chris-chambliss-300x239.jpg

Interview with Chris Chambliss

Btw, it is now the top of the 9th, 5-8 Houston, Final score Yankees 6, Houston 8

~~and that’s all she wrote~~

How pathetic am I

I was at the gym and looking through the TV channels to find something to watch when I came across a baseball game. I stopped and looked at the Yankees! But they didn’t have a game and they were playing at Yankee Stadium. And who was that pitching? He didn’t look familiar to me, then the announcer said, “El Duque, …. ” HuH? That was when I noticed the logo for “Yankees Classics” on the screen. I was happy to watch the game, in fact I was excited to watch a game from 8 years ago that I knew how it ended, sad and pathetic I know, although technically I didn’t know how this game ended, just how the series ended. 

And it wasn’t really ‘my boys’ playing, I mean I recognized the names, Scott Brosius, Tino Martinez, Paul O’Neill, Bernie Williams but I don’t really know them. Does that make me a ‘fake fan’ like my idiot co-worker says? Maybe it does, maybe I should stop writing this blog, nah …….

Course  my man Derek was shortstop and made a fabulous double play, tagging second and throwing the ball to first base where Mark …. no …. Tino tagged the runner out, Jorge was catching, made a beautiful catch of a popup foul ball, throwing his helmet down at the last minute, he looks so cool when he makes those catches, and I saw Andy Pettitte in the dugout along with Joe Torre (boo hiss) sitting with his back against the wall, scowling. 

When the Diamondbacks made their second run in the 8th inning I turned off the TV and left, well I kind of had just enough time to shower and change before they closed. So I missed Mariano (enter Sandman).

Below is a brief synopsis I copied from The Baseball Almanac, the link is at the bottom. It is a fantastic website. I love it.  

 
 Shutdown by the return of Schilling (on three days’ rest), the defending champions were staring at the possibility of a three-games-to-one deficit in Game 4. With one out, Paul O’Neill shot an opposite-field single in front of left fielder Luis Gonzalez and after Bernie Williams struck out, Tino Martinez hit the first pitch he saw from reliever Byung-Hyun Kim over the wall in right-center field. As the ball cleared the outfield barrier, the hometown crowd of 55,863 erupted as the invigorated Yankees spilled out of the dugout. The stadium that had fallen deadly silent after the Diamondbacks scored two runs (in the eighth) was deafening now and would not stop celebrating until Martinez came out on the deck for a curtain call. Rivera (1-0) cruised through the tenth and improved to 2-0 with five saves and a 0.71 ERA in nine postseason appearances. Derek Jeter completed the cycle in what had evolved into one of the most memorable games of all time by lining a 3-2 pitch over the right-field wall for the game-winner. 
 

2001 World Series
Game 4

Line Score / Box Score

2001 World Series Game 4 Capsule
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 R H E

Arizona

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 6 0

New York

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 4 7 0
Arizona Pitcher(s) New York Pitcher(s)

Curt Schilling
   Byung-Hyun Kim (L, 8
th)
   –
   –

Orlando Hernandez
   Mike Stanton (7
th)
   Ramiro Mendoza (8
th)
   Mariano Rivera (W, 10
th)

Arizona Home Runs New York Home Runs

Mark Grace (4th)

Shane Spencer (3rd)
Tino Martinez (9
th)
Derek Jeter (10
th)

Baseball Almanac

~~and that’s all she wrote~~

Tommy Henrich, whose heroics with NY Yankees earned him the nickname 'Old Reliable,' dies at 96

This is before my time, but since this is a Yankee blog I thought I should post part of the article and the link.

NEW YORK — Tommy Henrich, whose 11-year career with the Yankees earned him the nickname “Old Reliable,” died in Dayton, Ohio, early Tuesday morning. He was 96 and was believed to be the oldest living Yankee.

Henrich, an outfielder, won seven World Series championships with the Yankees from 1937-42 and 1946-50, his service to the team interrupted only by his military service in World War II.

“Tommy was a darn good ballplayer and teammate,” former Yankees teammate Yogi Berra said in a statement. “He always took being a Yankee to heart. He won a lot of championships and did whatever he could to help us win. When I came up in 1947, he taught me little nuances about playing the outfield. Being around Tommy made you feel good, whether playing cards or listening to him sing with that great voice. He was a proud man, and if you knew him, he made you proud too.”

In his career, Henrich hit .282 with 183 homers and 795 RBI. He also finished with 73 triples, twice leading the American League in that category.

Henrich was the first player to hit a walk-off homer to win a World Series game, homering off the Dodgers’ Don Newcombe to give the Yankees a 1-0 victory in the opening game of the 1949 series.

The Star Ledger